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Partner-delivered reflexology: effects on cancer pain and anxiety.

There are benefits to teaching even a brief reflexology session to family members of cancer patients who are open to learning the technique. In the below study, a nurse reflexologist taught partners of cancer patients how to administer a 30-minute foot reflexology session. Patients who received the session from their partners experienced a significant decrease in pain and anxiety.

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PMID: 17562639 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
Source of below abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17562639

Stephenson NL, Swanson M, Dalton J, Keefe FJ, Engelke M. Oncol Nurs Forum. 2007 Jan; 34(1):127-32.

Source:
School of Nursing, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, USA. stephensonn@mail.ecu.edu

Abstract
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES:
To compare the effects of partner-delivered foot reflexology and usual care plus attention on patients’ perceived pain and anxiety.

DESIGN:
The experimental pretest/post-test design included patient-partner dyads randomly assigned to an experimental or control group.

SETTING:
Four hospitals in the southeastern United States.

SAMPLE:
42 experimental and 44 control subjects comprised 86 dyads of patients with metastatic cancer and their partners, representing 16 different types of cancer; 23% of patients had lung cancer, followed by breast, colorectal, and head and neck cancer and lymphoma. The subjects had a mean age of 58.3 years, 51% were female, 66% had a high school education or less, and 58% were Caucasian, 40% were African American, and 1% were Filipino.

METHODS:
The intervention included a 15- to 30-minute teaching session on foot reflexology to the partner by a certified reflexologist, an optional 15- to 30-minute foot reflexology session for the partner, and a 30-minute, partner-delivered foot reflexology intervention for the patient. The control group received a 30-minute reading session from their partners.

MAIN RESEARCH VARIABLES:
Pain and anxiety.

FINDINGS:
Following the initial partner-delivered foot reflexology, patients experienced a significant decrease in pain intensity and anxiety.

CONCLUSIONS:
A nurse reflexologist taught partners how to perform reflexology on patients with metastatic cancer pain in the hospital, resulting in an immediate decrease in pain intensity and anxiety; minimal changes were seen in the control group, who received usual care plus attention.

IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING:
Hospitals could have qualified professionals offer reflexology as a complementary therapy and teach interested partners the modality.

PMID: 17562639 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17562639

Massage modalities and symptoms reported by cancer patients: narrative review

Myers CDWalton TBratsman LWilson JSmall B. "Massage modalities and symptoms reported by cancer patients: narrative review," Journal for the Society for Integrative Oncology, 2008 Winter; 6 (1): 19-28.
Source:
H.Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL 33612-9497, USA. cynthia.myers@moffitt.orgAbstract:

Massage modalities and symptoms reported by cancer patients: narrative review

The results of several studies on the use of massage therapies for cancer patients have been published in the peer-reviewed literature over the past 20 years. The current article provides a summary and critique of published studies in which patient-reported symptom ratings were assessed in relation to massage. Twenty-two studies are discussed. Most studies were on Swedish massage, followed by aromatherapy massage, foot reflexology, and acupressure. Symptoms assessed as outcomes included pain, fatigue, anxiety, nausea, and depression. Study designs included uncontrolled observational studies, crossover designs, and quasiexperimental and randomized controlled studies. Several studies included methodologic limitations such as small sample sizes, lack of blinded assessment, lack of accounting for subject attrition in statistical analyses, and other limitations. The results of the studies reviewed are mixed and vary as a function of several study characteristics. The most consistent symptom reduction was anxiety reduction. Additional well-designed studies are needed. Several recommendations are offered for future studies.

Foot reflexology used to alleviate anxiety and pain for patients with breast and lung cancer

January 31, 2012 1 comment

Foot reflexology used to alleviate anxiety and pain for patients with breast and lung cancer

Reflexology can offer help to patients suffering from breast and lung cancer according to researchers at the School of Nursing, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, USA.

The researchers monitored twenty three patients (most of whom were female and over 65 years old) diagnosed with breast or lung cancer. The patients were given a 30 minute reflexology treatment by a certified reflexologist and there were no other changes made to their daily schedule or in their medications.

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The results revealed that, following the foot reflexology treatments, the patients with breast and lung cancer experienced a significant decrease in anxiety, and one of three pain measures showed that patients with breast cancer experienced a significant decrease in pain.

The report of this small scale study concludes that reflexology treatment can lead to a significant decrease in anxiety for patients diagnosed with breast or lung cancer, and a decrease in pain for patients with breast cancer. This has important implications for nursing practice as both professionals and lay people can be taught reflexology.

Foot reflexology is a simple technique for human touch which can be performed anywhere, requires no special equipment, is non-invasive, and does not interfere with patients’ privacy.

Source: Oncol Nurs Forum 2000 Jan-Feb;27(1):67-72
The effects of foot reflexology on anxiety and pain in patients with breast and
lung cancer. Stephenson NL, Weinrich SP, Tavakoli AS


© The Internet Health Library 2000

http://www.internethealthlibrary.com/Health-problems/Pain_research_Foot_Reflexology.htm

PMID: 10660924 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

See also PubMed abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10660924