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The effects of foot reflexology on fatigue and insomnia in patients suffering from coal workers’ pneumoconiosis

In a study of 59 patients suffering from coal worker’s pneumoconiosis (CWP), fatigue and insomnia scores decreased significantly among members in the experimental group, who received hour-long sessions of foot reflexology twice a week for five weeks. It is suggested that foot reflexology be used as a nursing intervention for patients suffering from CWP.

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PMID: 16418548 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
Source of abstract below: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16418548

Lee YM, Sohng KY. “The effects of foot reflexology on fatigue and insomnia in patients suffering from coal workers’ pneumoconiosis.” Taehan Kanho Hakhoe Chi. 2005 Dec; 35(7): 1221-8.

[Article in Korean]

Source
Department of Nursing, Kangwon Tourism College, Kangwon-Do, Korea. ymlee6505@hanmail.net

Abstract

PURPOSE:
The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of foot reflexology on fatigue and insomnia in patients suffering from coal workers’ pneumoconiosis.

METHOD:
This study was a quasi-experimental study of pre-test and post-test design in a non-equivalent control group. The subjects of this study consisted of both the experimental group of twenty-nine and the control group of thirty coal workers’ pneumoconiosis patients. Data was collected from December 10, 2002 to February 15, 2003. Foot reflexology was performed for 60 minutes twice a week through five weeks in the experimental group, but none in the control group. To evaluate the effects of foot reflexology, the scores of fatigue and insomnia were measured before and after the experiment in both groups. Fatigue was evaluated by Fatigue Symptoms Inventory. Insomnia was measured with the visual analogue scale (VAS). Data of this experiment was analyzed by Chi-square test, t-test, unpaired t-test and Repeated Measures ANOVA with the SAS Program.

RESULTS:
The scores of fatigue and insomnia decreased in the experimental group but not in the control group. There was a significant difference of fatigue and insomnia between the two groups.

CONCLUSION:
It is suggested that foot reflexology might have beneficial effects on reducing fatigue and insomnia in patients suffering from coal workers’ pneumoconiosis, and can be recommended as a nursing intervention program for patients with coal workers’ pneumoconiosis.

PMID: 16418548 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16418548

The effects of foot reflexology on nausea, vomiting, and fatigue of breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

In a study of 34 breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, from the Department of Nursing at Inje University in Pusan, Korea, there was a significant decrease in nausea and vomiting in the experimental group receiving four 40-minute phases, or sessions, of foot reflexology. It is suggested that reflexology be used as a nursing intervention in the case of breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

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PMID: 15778569 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
Source of abstract below: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15778569

Yang JH., “The effects of foot reflexology on nausea, vomiting and fatigue of breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy,” Taehan Kanho Hakhoe Chi. 2005 Feb; 35(1): 177-85.

[Article in Korean]

Source:
Department of Nursing, Inje University, Pusan, Korea. jhyang@inje.ac.kr

Abstract
PURPOSE:
The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of foot reflexology on nausea, vomiting and fatigue in breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

METHOD:
The research was a quasi-experimental study using a non-equivalent pre-post design and was conducted from Jan. 26, to Mar. 20, 2004. The subjects consisted of 34 patients with 18 in the experimental group and 16 in control group. A pretest and 2 posttests were conducted to measure nausea, vomiting and fatigue. For the experimental group, foot reflexology, which was consisted of 4 phases for 40 minutes, was given by a researcher and 4 research assistants. The collected data were analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA using the SPSS WIN 10.0 program.

RESULTS:
There was a statistically significant decrease in nausea, and vomiting in the experimental group compared to the control group over two different times. In addition, there was a statistically significant decrease in fatigue in the experimental group compared to the control group over two different times.

CONCLUSION:
Foot reflexology was effective on nausea, vomiting and fatigue in breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy in this study. Therefore, foot reflexology can be usefully utilized as a nursing intervention in the field of cancer nursing for breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy.

PMID: 15778569 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15778569

Partner-delivered reflexology: effects on cancer pain and anxiety.

There are benefits to teaching even a brief reflexology session to family members of cancer patients who are open to learning the technique. In the below study, a nurse reflexologist taught partners of cancer patients how to administer a 30-minute foot reflexology session. Patients who received the session from their partners experienced a significant decrease in pain and anxiety.

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PMID: 17562639 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
Source of below abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17562639

Stephenson NL, Swanson M, Dalton J, Keefe FJ, Engelke M. Oncol Nurs Forum. 2007 Jan; 34(1):127-32.

Source:
School of Nursing, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, USA. stephensonn@mail.ecu.edu

Abstract
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES:
To compare the effects of partner-delivered foot reflexology and usual care plus attention on patients’ perceived pain and anxiety.

DESIGN:
The experimental pretest/post-test design included patient-partner dyads randomly assigned to an experimental or control group.

SETTING:
Four hospitals in the southeastern United States.

SAMPLE:
42 experimental and 44 control subjects comprised 86 dyads of patients with metastatic cancer and their partners, representing 16 different types of cancer; 23% of patients had lung cancer, followed by breast, colorectal, and head and neck cancer and lymphoma. The subjects had a mean age of 58.3 years, 51% were female, 66% had a high school education or less, and 58% were Caucasian, 40% were African American, and 1% were Filipino.

METHODS:
The intervention included a 15- to 30-minute teaching session on foot reflexology to the partner by a certified reflexologist, an optional 15- to 30-minute foot reflexology session for the partner, and a 30-minute, partner-delivered foot reflexology intervention for the patient. The control group received a 30-minute reading session from their partners.

MAIN RESEARCH VARIABLES:
Pain and anxiety.

FINDINGS:
Following the initial partner-delivered foot reflexology, patients experienced a significant decrease in pain intensity and anxiety.

CONCLUSIONS:
A nurse reflexologist taught partners how to perform reflexology on patients with metastatic cancer pain in the hospital, resulting in an immediate decrease in pain intensity and anxiety; minimal changes were seen in the control group, who received usual care plus attention.

IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING:
Hospitals could have qualified professionals offer reflexology as a complementary therapy and teach interested partners the modality.

PMID: 17562639 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17562639

Reflexology audit: patient satisfaction, impact on quality of life and availability in Scottish hospices

PMID: 12419988 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
Source of below abstract: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12419988

Milligan M, Fanning M, Hunter S, Tadjali M, Stevens E., “Reflexology audit: patient satisfaction, impact on quality of life and availability in Scottish hospices.” Int J Palliat Nurs. 2002 Oct; 8(10):489-96.

Source:
Ayrshire Cancer Support Group, Scotland.

Abstract
Complementary therapies are being accessed increasingly by cancer patients. The aims of this audit were to investigate the impact of reflexology on the quality of life of 20 cancer patients, to determine their satisfaction with the service provided and to investigate the availability of this therapy within Scottish hospices. The audit findings suggest that the clients were satisfied with the service received. Respondents noted that their quality of life was improved through a reduction in physical and emotional symptoms. It was found that the provision of reflexology within Scottish hospices varied, with less than half providing this service. The results of this audit suggest that reflexology may be a worthwhile treatment for other cancer patients and requires further research to evaluate the benefits.

PMID: 12419988 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12419988

Feasibility of a reflexology and guided imagery intervention during chemotherapy: results of a quasi-experimental study

Part of Dr. Gwen K. Wyatt’s research study, an Intervention for Advanced Breast Cancer, carried out from 2005-2010 at Michigan State University.

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PMID: 17573322 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
Source of abstract below: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17573322

Wyatt G, Sikorskii A, Siddiqi A, Given CW., “Feasibility of a reflexology and guided imagery intervention during chemotherapy: results of a quasi-experimental study.” Oncol Nurs Forum. 2007 May; 34(3): 635-42.

The College of Nursing, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA. gwyatt@msu.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES:
To evaluate patient characteristics to predict selection and maintenance of a complementary therapy and the feasibility of a randomized clinical trial (RCT) of complementary therapies.

DESIGN:
Quasi-experimental, exploratory study, unblinded and nonrandomized.

SETTING:
A comprehensive cancer center in Michigan.

SAMPLE:
96 patients undergoing chemotherapy, predominantly Caucasian women.

METHODS:
Consenting patients with caregivers could choose a reflexology, guided imagery, guided imagery plus reflexology, or interview-only group. Patients without caregivers were restricted to guided imagery or interview-only groups. Data on demographics, depression, anxiety, and functional status were collected using established instruments.

MAIN RESEARCH VARIABLES:
Quality of life (QOL) and patient characteristics in relation to complementary therapy choice.

FINDINGS:
Patients who chose a complementary therapy rather than an interview only tended to be older and in worse health and had higher percentages of lung cancer, late-stage cancers, higher anxiety, depressive symptoms, and physical limitations at baseline. Patients lost from the guided imagery and guided imagery plus reflexology groups had greater symptom severity, depressive symptoms and anxiety, and worse physical and emotional well-being than those lost from the reflexology group.

CONCLUSIONS:
Patient characteristics influence choice of complementary therapies, highlighting the need for RCTs to evaluate the true effect of complementary therapies on the QOL of patients with cancer. Further research on complementary therapies can help healthcare providers identify patients who are likely to benefit most by addressing nursing-sensitive outcomes.

IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING:
An RCT of reflexology as a single therapy for females with breast cancer is most feasible compared to other complementary therapies.

PMID: 17573322 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17573322

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See also: Chicago Tribune article February 11, 2009

See also: Statement from Dr. Gwen K. Wyatt to Reflexology Association of America in 2008
Courtesy of RAA – Reflexology Association of America
Source: http://www.reflexology-usa.org/articles/dr_gwen_breast_cancer.pdf

Massage modalities and symptoms reported by cancer patients: narrative review

Myers CDWalton TBratsman LWilson JSmall B. "Massage modalities and symptoms reported by cancer patients: narrative review," Journal for the Society for Integrative Oncology, 2008 Winter; 6 (1): 19-28.
Source:
H.Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL 33612-9497, USA. cynthia.myers@moffitt.orgAbstract:

Massage modalities and symptoms reported by cancer patients: narrative review

The results of several studies on the use of massage therapies for cancer patients have been published in the peer-reviewed literature over the past 20 years. The current article provides a summary and critique of published studies in which patient-reported symptom ratings were assessed in relation to massage. Twenty-two studies are discussed. Most studies were on Swedish massage, followed by aromatherapy massage, foot reflexology, and acupressure. Symptoms assessed as outcomes included pain, fatigue, anxiety, nausea, and depression. Study designs included uncontrolled observational studies, crossover designs, and quasiexperimental and randomized controlled studies. Several studies included methodologic limitations such as small sample sizes, lack of blinded assessment, lack of accounting for subject attrition in statistical analyses, and other limitations. The results of the studies reviewed are mixed and vary as a function of several study characteristics. The most consistent symptom reduction was anxiety reduction. Additional well-designed studies are needed. Several recommendations are offered for future studies.

Reflexology for symptom relief in patients with cancer

January 31, 2012 1 comment
Wilkinson SLockhart KGambles MStorey L., “Reflexology for symptom relief in patients with cancer,” Cancer Nursing. 2008 Sep-Oct; 31(5): 354-60; quiz 361-2.

Source
Department of Mental Health Sciences, Royal Free and University College Medical School, The Hampstead Campus, London, England.

Abstract
Complementary therapies are increasingly being used in hospices and hospitals alongside orthodox treatments in an attempt to improve patients’ emotional, spiritual, psychological, and physical well-being. An average of 31% of UK patients with cancer use some form of complementary therapy. Many UK cancer centers, out-patient units, and hospices are providing complementary services. There is strong anecdotal evidence that complementary therapies assist in the palliation of physical and psychological symptoms. This systematic review examines the research evidence base for the effectiveness of reflexology in cancer care. The study reports the results of a systematic review following the Cochrane principles of systematic reviewing. No meta-analysis was possible. Studies were retrieved from a comprehensive search of electronic databases from their start dates. An initial search was carried out in 2003 and updated in 2005 to 2006. Eligible studies were randomized controlled trials, controlled before and after studies, and interrupted time-series studies. Participants were adults with a diagnosis of cancer, receiving care in any healthcare setting. Interventions were limited to reflexology carried out by a qualified therapist as distinguished from another healthcare professional carrying out areflexology intervention. Outcome measures were patient-reported levels of physical and psychological indices of symptom distress and quality of life (measured using validated assessment tools).

PMID: 18772659 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
Source: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18772659